Edible Wild Plants: Rose Hips

Rose Hips, which are not a particular plant but rather the fruit of the rose plant. The rose hip, also known as rose haw or rose hep, is the fruit of the rose plant, that typically is red-to-orange, but ranges from dark purple to black in some species. Rose hips begin to form after successful pollination of flowers in spring or early summer, and ripen in late summer through autumn.

Edible Wild Plants - Rose Hips

The wild dog rose is the type of rose most often cultivated for their hips. This plant grows up to ten feet tall and bears a white, very fragrant flower. Once the flower has bloomed, and all the petals have fallen off, the hip is picked and used in a wide variety of preparations. Rose hips are the best source of vitamin C; they contain 50% more vitamin C than oranges.

A single tablespoon of the pulp gives an adult more than the recommended daily allowance of 60 mg. They can be eaten raw, after being put through a blender, or soaked in water overnight and then cooked in the water for about half an hour. Because of the high vitamin C content they are an excellent immune system booster, and are often used as a supplement to prevent or treat a cold. The pulp from rose hips may be used in sauces or made into jelly.

In recent news a pill made from Rose Hip extract cut arthritis pain, as well as help reduce high cholesterol.

Rose Hips for Medicinal Uses
Pill Made from Rose Hip Extract Cuts Arthritis Pain

February 14th 2014

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/health/Pill-made-from-rose-hip-extract-cuts-arthritis-pain/articleshow/30289441.cms

A new pill made from rose-hip extract has been found to reduce the agony of osteoarthritis sufferers by an astonishing 90 percent.

Human trials suggest a wonder supplement called Gopo – named after a key ingredient of the plant – could provide a breakthrough for six million Britons whose lives are blighted by joint pain. Pills containing the supplement are now available in the UK for the first time – for just 15 pence each, the Daily Express reported. Scientists said that they have proved the herbal remedy possesses special properties which can alleviate the condition in the hand especially.

[snip]

The pill gave round-the-clock relief, and sufferers were a third less likely to use conventional painkillers after taking the supplement. Rose-hip, also known as rose haw, is the fruit of the rose plant and is commonly used for jam, jelly, syrup, soup, wine and marmalade. It contains high levels of vitamin C and lycopene, a powerful antioxidant that helps lower cholesterol.

During World War II, British citizens were encouraged to gather rose hips to make vitamin C syrup for children. Rose hips have an herbal flavor that’s suggestive of roses without tasting floral.

Edible Parts

  • Flowers
  • Buds

The flowers and buds are edible raw or boiled. In an emergency, you can peel and eat the young shoots. You can boil fresh, young leaves in water to make a tea.

After the flower petals fall, eat the rose hips; the pulp is highly nutritious and an excellent source of vitamin C. Crush or grind dried rose hips to make flour.

Caution: Eat only the outer portion of the fruit as the seeds of some species are quite prickly and can cause internal distress.

Rose Hip Uses
Uses

Rose hips are used for tisanes, jam, jelly, syrup, rose hip soup, beverages, pies, bread, wine, and marmalade. They can also be eaten raw, like a berry, if care is used to avoid the hairs inside the fruit.

A few rose species are sometimes grown for the ornamental value of their hips, such as Rosa moyesii, which has prominent large red bottle-shaped fruits.

Rose hips have recently become popular as a healthy treat for pet chinchillas and guinea pigs. These small rodents are unable to manufacture their own vitamin C and are unable to digest many vitamin-C rich foods. Rose hips provide a sugarless, safe way to increase their vitamin C intake.

Rose hips are also fed to horses. The dried and powdered form can be fed at a maximum of 1 tablespoon per day to improve coat condition and new hoof growth.

The fine hairs found inside rose hips are used as itching powder. Dried rose hips are also sold for primitive crafts and home fragrance purposes.

Rose hips were used in many food preparations by the indigenous peoples of the Americas.

Rose hips can be used to make Palinka, a traditional Hungarian alcoholic beverage, popular in Hungary, Romania, and other countries sharing Austro-Hungarian history. Rose hips are also the central ingredient of Cockta, the fruity-tasting national soft drink of Slovenia.

In his book Stalking the Faraway Places, wild foods enthusiast Euell Gibbons recommended stuffed rose hips made by slicing a large hip in half, removing the seeds and inserting a wild raspberry.

Rose hips are commonly used as a tisane, often blended with hibiscus, and also as an oil. They can also be used to make jam, jelly, marmalade, and rose hip wine. Rose hip soup, “nyponsoppa”, is especially popular in Sweden. Rhodomel, a type of mead, is made with rose hips

Medicinal Uses

Rose hips are particularly high in vitamin C content, one of the richest plant sources available. However, RP-HPLC assays of fresh rose hips and several commercially available products revealed a wide range of L-ascorbic acid content, ranging from 0.03 to 1.3%. Rose hips of some species, especially Rosa canina (Dog Rose) and R. majalis, have been used as a source of vitamin C. During World War II, the people of Britain were encouraged through letters to The Times newspaper, articles in the British Medical Journal, and pamphlets produced by Claire Loewenfeld, a dietitian working for Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children, to gather wild-grown rose hips and to make a vitamin C syrup for children. This was because German submarines were sinking many commercial ships: citrus fruits from the tropics were very difficult to import.

Rose hips contain plenty of lycopene, an important and strong antioxidant that prevents oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) as well as of many cellular membranes. Lycopene in rose hips differs more in its isomer distribution than in other sources (tomatoes, pink grapefruit).

Rose hips also contain some vitamin A and B, essential fatty acids, and antioxidant flavonoids.

A study of a rose hip preparation for treating rheumatoid arthritis concluded that there was a benefit, apparently due to both anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects.

Rose hips are used to help prevent colds and influenza.

Where Does Rose Hips Grow?

Since rose hips are the fruit of a rose plant. You can find them where-ever roses grow.

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