Archive for the 'Survival Gardening' Category

Organic Fertilizer & Pest Control For Your Garden

Fertilizer Energizing Earthworm Elixir 2.5 pounds earthworm castings 1/4 pound Epsom salts 2 tablespoons instant tea Combine and put 1 cup under each transplanted tomato or melon before planting. Organic Fertilizer Recipe Mix uniformly, in parts by volume: 4 parts seed meal 1/4 part ordinary agricultural lime, best finely ground 1/4 part gypsum (or double […]

Edible Wild Plants: Wild Carrot (Daucus Carota)

Wild carrots, also called Queen Anne’s Lace, is Daucus Carota, which you may recognize is the exact species of cultivated carrot. They are exactly the same plant, differentiated only in the subspecies. By the time the carrots are wild, they are white rather than orange and are much smaller (though the greens are still full […]

How To Make Your Own Seed Packets

You need a piece of card or brown paper that measures at least 7 inches (18cm) x 6 inches (15cm). Use the template below to draw your seed packet outline. Cut out your template, then make folds along the dotted lines. Stick tabs A and B to the back of the packet. Stick or draw […]

How To Save Seeds From Your Garden

After flowering, all plants produce seed. This is one way in which plants reproduce. Seed comes in many different types, shapes and sizes. Seeds are also spread in many ways. Seeds in pods – when ripe, the pods such as those on Broom can explode and split open and the seeds shoot out. Hooked seeds […]

Starting Seeds With Recycled Plastic Bottles

  One of the best steps to a successful garden in the summer is to start out your plants strong. To ensure that many homestead gardeners turn to indoor sprouting first before they transplant them outside. This makes sure their plants have a constant, frost free, beginning to grow to their full potential without being […]

Edible Wild Plants: Creeping Snowberry (Gaultheria Hispidula)

Creeping Snowberry (Gaultheria Hispidula) is a low trailing perennial plant found in bogs and wetland forests in the northern United States and Canada. The leaves are round and only 5 to 10 millimeters long. The creeping stems form leafy mats on logs and hummocks, often near Sphagnum moss. The stems and under-surface of the leaves […]

Edible Wild Plants: Sheep Sorrel (Rumex Acetosella)

Sheep Sorrel (Rumex Acetosella) is a popular nibble with children and is familiar to most trampers as a practical thirst-quencher. It is a readily available and attractive base for a puree, a small amount of tender growth, after boiling, being mashed through a strainer, and added to a rice stock, milk or other stock, thickened […]

Edible Wild Plants: American Wintergreen, Checkerberry, Tea Berry (Gaultheria Procumbens)

The Wintergreen (Gaultheria Procumbens) plant was the original source for the favored wintergreen oil. It is also known as Checkerberry and Tea Berry. It was once extracted from the plant to use in candies and as a spice. With the risk of over-harvest of this slow growing plant a second source was found. This new […]

Edible Wild Plants: Tulip Prickly Pear (Opuntia Phaeacantha)

Tulip Prickly Pear (Opuntia phaeacantha), also known as the Mojave Prickly Pear, is a low-growing, spreading cactus with flat stem segments (pads). The pads are relatively long and broad, and the spines are usually confined to the upper 70% of the pads. Areoles (where the spines originate) usually spread about 3/4-inch apart, and areoles without […]

The Many Uses For Pumpkin Seeds

Over a century ago, American farmers noted that when their livestock munched on pumpkin seeds, they seemed to urinate more often. They weren’t the first to notice the seeds’ effects. The Iroquois had long used pumpkin seed as a diuretic, and the Cherokee gave it to children to control bed-wetting, since it seemed to help […]

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